535 Bridgeway - The Sugar Cube

The Sugar Cube is located at the water’s edge in Sausalito, California with world-class views of San Francisco, Angel Island and the East Bay. The existing windows have been enlarged to take advantage of the views and breeze. A third floor deck and entertainment room were added to provide an exquisite indoor/outdoor living and entertainment experience.

The third floor addition is set back from the street to preserve the massing of the 1912 structure while the additional mass on the third floor creates a transitional structure between the historic district to the north and the sizeable contemporary homes being built to the south.

Exterior materials have been augmented through the thoughtful use of zinc panels, stainless steel, and glass.

535 Bridgeway - The Sugar Cube

The Sugar Cube is located at the water’s edge in Sausalito, California with world-class views of San Francisco, Angel Island and the East Bay. The existing windows have been enlarged to take advantage of the views and breeze. A third floor deck and entertainment room were added to provide an exquisite indoor/outdoor living and entertainment experience.

The third floor addition is set back from the street to preserve the massing of the 1912 structure while the additional mass on the third floor creates a transitional structure between the historic district to the north and the sizeable contemporary homes being built to the south.

Exterior materials have been augmented through the thoughtful use of zinc panels, stainless steel, and glass.

Lehmann Residence

This Palo Alto project consists of a gentleman farmer’s estate including a 6,700 square foot house, a guesthouse, barns, pond and vineyard.

Belvedere: West Wind and East Wind Houses

The West Wind House and East Wind House residences and grounds derive character and richness from a humble understanding of site setting and nature.  The idiom of these residences is foremost a well sited home evocative of nature, given form as expression of the materials and natural forces on the site. Set below the level of the road and ridge these homes peak out from behind existing structures and from within the existing tree canopy. 

The homes maintain an honesty about their site. Utilizing material harvested from the site, with curved roof forms evoking bending tree canopies and moss covered rock outcroppings and materials that evoke the gray fog spilling down the hillside – the architecture seeks to vest the homes with permanence and a timeless quality amidst an enduring landscape.

Sausalito Hillside House

This traditional residential home in Sausalito was updated with a new modern look that includes a new deck, bathrooms, kitchen, and the latest technology including a pneumatic elevator. It has a spacious open layout that doubles as a display space for the owner’s art collection.

North Slope Houses

The not so big North Slope houses (each less than 2,500 square feet) are embedded in a sheer wooded hillside and look out onto inspiring views of the San Francisco Bay. The rooms and floors are stacked around the skylight stairway to flood the interior with light and are arranged so that each room is oriented toward the view and benefits from a secondary source of natural light.

Private balconies and folding glass walls open the homes and the inhabitants to the surrounding nature of the woods and the Bay.

Ross Valley Residence

The house was designed in response to a narrow forested flag lot in the Ross Valley. The resulting home was designed to preserve privacy from the neighbors while collecting the available light filtering though the ancient redwoods that populate this valley.

The house is a series of discrete pavilions supported by the art gallery spine. Careful fenestration of the enclosures meters views of the forest canopy and provides light into most rooms on three sides. Skylights vaulted ceilings flood the rooms and gallery with dappled light revealing the experience of the surrounding forest.

The ground floor was designed for entertaining and for gatherings of friends and family in the courtyards, pavilions and patios. The second floor is the private portion of the house with bedrooms and a private library, glass bridge, and study.

Oliver Residence

Searching for the sun, this modest addition takes advantage of the steeply sloping site while providing an aesthetically pleasing location for the thin film solar collectors that are part of the curved roof.  Building vertically maximizes the useable space available while minimizing site excavation and foundations. The stacked design maximizes views to the distant hills from the double height master bedroom.

Kimball Residence

A Pacific Heights remodel and addition, this residential design responds to the neighbor’ concerns with view preservation while providing bridge-to-bridge vistas for our clients.

Hannah Residence

The renovation of a small exurban farmhouse was initiated after a wind felled eucalyptus tree crushed most of the existing home. During the redesign process the house orientation was reconfigured to take advantage of views to the owner’s horse pasture. A glazed factory built roll up garage door was installed as one of the living room walls to take advantage of this view. Most of the year this door is kept open and helps to create a sense of continuity between indoor and outdoor living spaces. The house’s entry doubles as a gallery for modern art. Recycled and off shelf industrial materials are used throughout the project.

Bassett Studio

The Bassett studio functions as an art gallery and landscape architecture studio. The client desired an airy space to exhibit paintings by Sachio Yamashita, as well as to carry out work in his landscape architecture practice. The design includes green building aspects, such as heat pump thermal heating/cooling system, recycled framing members and exposed building materials (the project exceeds Build It Green and LEED residential requirements). This project also incorporates reused found and handcrafted objects that range from light fixtures to dragons on the roof.

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